Much as you may worry about having your little one having vaccinations, cringe at the thought of needles, as a parent you know that it’s a necessary evil and that the vaccinations offered to your child over the course of the next few years could indeed be life saving.

Your Health Visitor and doctor’s surgery will make sure that you are aware of what vaccinations are routinely offered to everyone in the UK for free on the NHS, and the ages at which they should ideally be given.

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Here’s a list of what vaccinations are given to children routinely in the UK and when:

8 weeks

1st: diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis (whooping cough), polio and haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib)

This is the 5-in-1 vaccine, and is given to children when they are 8, 12 and 16 weeks old. It protects against diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis (whooping cough), polio and Haemophilus influenzae.

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1st: pneumococcal infection

This is the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV), and is given to children when they are 8 and 16 weeks old, and between 12 and 13 months old. It protects against pneumococcal infection, which can cause diseases such as pneumonia, septicaemia and meningitis.

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1st: rotavirus

This is an oral vaccine given to children who are 8 and 12 weeks old. It protects against rotavirus infection, a common cause of diarrhoea and sickness.

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1st: Men B

This is the Men B vaccine, and is given to children when they are 8 weeks, 16 weeks and 12 months old. It protects against infection from meningococcal (Men) group B bacteria, which are responsible for more than 90% of meningococcal infections in young children.


12 weeks

2nd: diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, polio and Hib

This is the 5-in-1 vaccine, and is given to children when they are 8, 12 and 16 weeks old. It protects against diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis (whooping cough), polio and Haemophilus influenzae.

More information

2nd: rotavirus

This is an oral vaccine given to children who are 8 and 12 weeks old. It protects against rotavirus infection, a common cause of diarrhoea and sickness.


16 weeks

3rd: diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, polio and Hib

This is the 5-in-1 vaccine, and is given to children when they are 8, 12 and 16 weeks old. It protects against diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis (whooping cough), polio and Haemophilus influenzae.

More information

2nd: pneumococcal infection

This is the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV), and is given to children who are 8 and 16 weeks old, and between 12 and 13 months old. It protects against pneumococcal infection, which can cause diseases such as pneumonia, septicaemia and meningitis.

More information

2nd: Men B

This is the Men B vaccine, and is given to children when they are 8 weeks, 16 weeks and 12 months old. It protects against infection from meningococcal (Men) group B bacteria, which are responsible for more than 90% of meningococcal infections in young children.


12 -13 months

Hib and Men C

This is the Hib/MenC vaccine, and is given to children when they are between 12 and 13 months old. The vaccine protects against Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) and meningococcal group C bacteria, which can cause meningitis and septicaemia.

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1st: measles, mumps and rubella

This is the MMR vaccine, and is given to children when they are between 12 and 13 months and old, and at 40 months old. It protects against measles, mumps and rubella.

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Booster: pneumococcal infection

This is the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV), and is given to children who are 8 and 16 weeks old, and between 12 and 13 months old. It protects against pneumococcal infection, which can cause diseases such as pneumonia, septicaemia and meningitis.

More information

Booster: Men B

This is the Men B vaccine, and is given to children when they are 8 weeks, 16 weeks and 12 months. It protects against infection from meningococcal (Men) group B bacteria, which are responsible for more than 90% of meningococcal infections in young children.


2-3 years

Annual: children’s flu vaccine

This is an annual nasal spray vaccine for two-, three- and four-year-olds, plus children in school years one and two, as part of the NHS childhood vaccination programme.

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Annual: children’s flu vaccine

This is an annual nasal spray vaccine for two-, three- and four-year-olds, plus children in school years one and two, as part of the NHS childhood vaccination programme.


3 years 4 months

Booster: diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis and polio

This is the 4-in-1 booster vaccine given to children around the age of three years and four months old. It protects against diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis (whooping cough) and polio.

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2nd: measles, mumps and rubella

This is the MMR vaccine given to children between 12 and 13 months old, and around three years and four months old. It provides protection against measles, mumps and rubella.